Android 5.0 Lollipop aka “Android L” Is Official, Here’s What’s New!

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Good things happen when everybody’s invited. A few years ago, we had the thought that phones (and stuff that hadn’t even been invented yet like tablets and smart watches) would be way more interesting if everyone could build new things together. So we created Android as an open platform, and put it out there for everyone to imagine, invent, make, or buy whatever they wanted.

Since then, all kinds of people—from companies big and small to folks on Kickstarter, kids in schools, and crazy smart developers—have been innovating faster, together, more than we ever could alone. And the best part is that every time someone new joins in, things get more interesting, unexpected, and wonderful for all of us.

Getting everyone in on the party is the same spirit behind Android One—an effort recently launched in India (coming to other countries soon) to make great smartphones available to the billions of people around the world who aren’t yet online. It’s also why we’re excited about Lollipop, our newest software release, which is designed to meet the diverse needs of the billion-plus people who already use Android today.

Joining the party: Android 5.0 Lollipop
As previewed at Google I/O, Lollipop is our largest, most ambitious release on Android with over 5,000 new APIs for developers. Lollipop is designed to be flexible, to work on all your devices and to be customized for you the way you see fit. And just like Android has always been, it’s designed to be shared.

Lollipop is made for a world where moving throughout the day means interacting with a bunch of different screens—from phones and tablets to TVs. With more devices connecting together, your expectation is that things just work. With Lollipop, it’s easier than ever to pick up where you left off, so the songs, photos, apps, and even recent searches from one of your Android devices can be immediately enjoyed across all the other ones.

As you switch from one screen to another, the experience should feel the same. So Lollipop has a consistent design across devices—an approach we call Material Design. Now content responds to your touch, or even your voice, in more intuitive ways, and transitions between tasks are more fluid.

Lollipop also gives you more control over your device. You can now adjust your settings so that only certain people and notifications can get through, for example, when you’re out to dinner or in the middle of an important meeting. And when an important notification does come through, you can see it directly from the lockscreen.

Fan of Nexus 9 tablets

And because we’re using our devices a lot more, there’s a new battery saver feature that extends the life of your device by up to 90 minutes—helpful if you’re far from a power outlet. We’ve enabled multiple user accounts and guest user mode for keeping your personal stuff private. And you can now secure your device with a PIN, password, pattern, or even by pairing your phone to a trusted device like your watch or car with Smart Lock. But this is just a small taste of Lollipop. Learn more on android.com.

Read More:

Google Reveals The Nexus 9: Android’s iPad Air!

Google reveals the Nexus 6, pre-orders begin on October 29th!

Meet the Nexus family, now running Lollipop
Advances in computing are driven at the intersection of hardware and software. That’s why we’ve always introduced Nexus devices alongside our platform releases. Rather than creating software in the abstract, we work with hardware partners to build Nexus devices to help push the boundaries of what’s possible. Nexus devices also serve as a reference for the ecosystem as they develop on our newest release. And for Lollipop, we have a few new Nexus treats to share with you.

First, with Motorola, we developed the Nexus 6. This new phone has a contoured aluminum frame, a 6-inch Quad HD display and a 13 megapixel camera. The large screen is complemented by dual front-facing stereo speakers that deliver high-fidelity sound, making it as great for movies and gaming as it is for doing work. It also comes with a Turbo Charger, so you can get up to six hours of use with only 15 minutes of charge.

Next, a new tablet built in partnership with HTC. Nexus 9, with brushed metal sides and 8.9-inch screen, is small enough to easily carry around in one hand, yet big enough to work on. And since more and more people want to have the same simple experience they have on their tablets when they have to do real work, we designed a keyboard folio that magnetically attaches to the Nexus 9, folds into two different angles and rests securely on your lap like a laptop.

Finally, we’re releasing the first device running Android TV: Nexus Player, a collaboration with Asus, is a streaming media player for movies, music and videos. It’s also a first-of-its-kind Android gaming device. With Nexus Player you can play Android games on your HDTV with a gamepad, then keep playing on your phone while you’re on the road. Nexus Player is Google Cast Ready so you can cast your favorite entertainment from almost any Chromebook or Android or iOS phone or tablet to your TV.

Nexus 9 and Nexus Player will be available for pre-order on October 17 and in stores starting November 3. Nexus 6 will be available for pre-order in late October and in stores in November—with options for an unlocked version though Play store, or a monthly contract or installment plan through carriers, including AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, U.S. Cellular and Verizon. Specific carrier rollout will be subject to certification completion and will vary. Check outgoogle.com/nexus for more details on availability.

Android 5.0 Lollipop, which comes on Nexus 6, Nexus 9 and Nexus Player, will also be available on Nexus 4, 5, 7, 10 and Google Play edition devices in the coming weeks.

Read More:

Google Reveals The Nexus 9: Android’s iPad Air!

Google reveals the Nexus 6, pre-orders begin on October 29th!

The party’s just getting started
With this latest release of Android Lollipop, we’re excited to continue working with our developer community, hardware partners, and all of you. More ideas and more creators is what gets us all to better ideas faster. And since everyone’s invited to the party, we hope you’ll join in the fun by creating and sharing an Android characterthat captures a little bit of who you are—one of a kind. Enjoy!

Google Reveals The Nexus 9: Android’s iPad Air!

Nexus 9

It’s been nearly two years since we’ve seen a new Nexus tablet, but the wait is over. Alongside anew Nexus 6 phone, the Nexus Player, and a new version of Android, the Nexus 9 is finally official. It’s like the iPad Air, but Android.

Fan of Nexus 9 tablets

Just as the rumors indicated, the new Nexus 9 is a 9-inch tablet made by HTC, sporting an Nvidia Tegra K1 for a brain along with a Kepler DX11 GPU, front-facing speakers, a 2048 x 1440 281 PPI LCD screen, and a 6700 mAh battery. It’s got a nice aluminum trim, and on the back it has that familiar soft-touch carbonate back and “Nexus” branding, like an upscaled Nexus 5. And it’s available in white and black and tan. And also, if you feel like Surfacing it up, the Nexus 9 has a an optional keyboard case that will retail for (a hefty) $220.

The Nexus 9 Is Android's iPad Air

It’s a Nexus device launching around the same time as a major revision of Android, so naturally it’ll come loaded up with Android Lollipop. It’s available for pre-order starting October 17th, with a starting price of $400.

Side view of Nexus 9 tablet

Google reveals the Nexus 6, pre-orders begin on October 29th!

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Forget the pomp and circumstance that comes with a formal launch event — Google just outed the new Nexus 6 on its official Android blog, and it’s just about everything the rumor mill said the Motorola-made device would be. The Nexus 6 might look like a super-sized version of this year’s Moto X — down to the speaker grilles and the lock button/volume rocker placement along the phone’s right edge — but it packs plenty of notable improvements over its smaller, non-Nexus cousin. 5.9-inch Quad HD screen? Check? The more powerful Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 chipset, clocked at 2.7GHz? You betcha. Hefty 3,220 mAh battery? Of course. It’s as if Motorola addressed nearly every issue we had with the Moto X, and capped things off with a big ol’ Nexus logo on the back. In fact, the only component that doesn’t seem to have been upgraded is the 13-megapixel camera and dual-LED flash layout on the Nexus 6’s back (and that’s sort of a shame). Naturally, It’s also the first phone to run Android 5.0 Lollipop (which Google waseager to tease the other day).

Despite the torrent of leaks we’ve seen recently, Google still isn’t ready to spill most of the juicy details. The Verge reports that pre-orders for the Nexus 6 will kick off on October 29 with a full retail launch to follow some time in November, but expect to shell out a few pretty pennies for it. You’ll be able to nab your own Nexus 6 for a whopping $649, making it the most expensive Nexus phone to date (though the decidedly non-Nexus Sony Z Ultra came in at the same price).Itching to pick it up with a little carrier discount? Not to worry: AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint and Verizon Wireless will all be getting the Nexus at some point, and if a recent slip-up is any indication, it could be damn cheap. An error on AT&T’s site suggested that the 6 could go for as little as $49.99 with a two year contract — if true, that’d make the Nexus half the price of the Moto X.

Google’s Android 5.0 is called Lollipop!

Google has just announced that the next major version of Android, 5.0, will be known as Lollipop. After months of teasing the OS, the search giant is finally taking what was previously known as Android “L” into the mainstream, with the first set of the devices set to be arriving soon. Speaking of which, Android Lollipop will make its debut on the new Nexus 9, a big-screen smartphone from Motorola; and the Nexus 9, a tablet made by HTC; and the Nexus Player, a media-streaming box with Android TV, the first one with Google’s new set-top platform.

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