Introducing the Samsung Galaxy A3 and Galaxy A5, Samsung’s slimmest phones to date

Samsung took the wraps off the Galaxy A5 and Galaxy A3 duo of smartphones. The Android duet is targeting young buyers with entry-level and mid-range specs, variety of colors, and decidedly premium all-metal unibody.

Samsung Galaxy A5 packs 1.2GHz quad-core CPU and 2GB of RAM.There’s 16GB of built-in memory, which can be further expanded via microSD card slot.

The device’s display is a 5″ HD Super AMOLED unit (likely with 720p resolution). A 13MP main camera, 5MP front-facing unit, and full connectivity suite that includes LTE round up the highlights in its spec sheet. Samsung Galaxy A5 boots TouchWiz-ed Android 4.4 KitKat.

Physical measures of the Samsung Galaxy A5 are 139.3 x 69.7 x 6.7mm, while its weight tips the scale at 123 grams. The handset is powered by a 2,300mAh battery.

Samsung Galaxy A3 on the other hand packs 1.2GHz quad-core CPU and a gig of RAM. Onboard memory is 8GB, which can be further expanded via microSD card slot.

The display of the Galaxy A3 is a 4.5” qHD Super AMOLED unit. The device’s main camera is an 8MP unit, coupled with 5MP front-facing snapper. Full connectivity suite is also on board, headed by Cat4 LTE. Like its bigger brother, the A3 boots Android 4.4 KitKat with TouchWiz UI.

The measures of Samsung Galaxy A3 are 130.1 x 65.5 x 6.9mm, while its weight comes in at only 110.3 grams. A 1,900mAh battery powers the smartphone.

You can check out Samsung’s official promo video for the Galaxy A family below.

Samsung Galaxy A3 and Galaxy A5 will be available in select markets including China in November. Pricing is yet to be announced.

Apple CEO Tim Cook: “I am proud to be gay…”

Apple CEO Tim Cook on Thursday made a surprising announcement in an opinion piece on Bloomberg Businessweek, which is very much in line with his many public notes in the recent past about diversity at the workplace. “While I have never denied my sexuality, I haven’t publicly acknowledged it either, until now. So let me be clear: I’m proud to be gay, and I consider being gay among the greatest gifts God has given me,” Cook said  in the essay.

The executive admitted that he never hid his sexual orientation while working at Apple, even though he had not publicly declared it until now.

“For years, I’ve been open with many people about my sexual orientation. Plenty of colleagues at Apple know I’m gay, and it doesn’t seem to make a difference in the way they treat me. Of course, I’ve had the good fortune to work at a company that loves creativity and innovation and knows it can only flourish when you embrace people’s differences. Not everyone is so lucky,” Cook said.

At the same time, the CEO of one of the most valuable companies in the world says that being gay was “tough and uncomfortable at times,” but it helped him understand “what it means to be in the minority and provided a window into the challenges that people in other minority groups deal with every day.”

“It’s also given me the skin of a rhinoceros, which comes in handy when you’re the CEO of Apple,” Cook said.

“I don’t consider myself an activist, but I realize how much I’ve benefited from the sacrifice of others,” Cook wrote in the essay. “So if hearing that the CEO of Apple is gay can help someone struggling to come to terms with who he or she is, or bring comfort to anyone who feels alone, or inspire people to insist on their equality, then it’s worth the trade-off with my own privacy.”

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Google wants to flood your body with tiny magnets to search for disease!

Google’s ambition to cure death is beginning to take shape in a new product from its Google X division. Andrew Conrad, the head of the company’s life sciences division, today announced the details of an effort that would use nanotechnology to identify signs of disease. The project would employ tiny magnetic nanoparticles, said to be one-thousandth the width of a red blood cell, to bind themselves to various molecules and identify them as trouble spots.

Google’s nanotechnology project, which would also involve a wearable magnetic device that tracks the particles, is said to be at least five years off, according to an accompanying report in the Wall Street Journal. The company is still figuring out how many nanoparticles are necessary to identify markers of disease, and scientists will have to develop coatings for the particles that will let them bind to targeted cells. One idea is to deliver the nanoparticles via a pill that you would swallow.

FUNDAMENTALLY, OUR FOE IS DEATH.

If Google's project become successful, new technology could 'help physicians detect a disease that's starting to develop in the body'. (Thinkstock)More than 100 Googlers are now working on the project. “We’re trying to stave off death by preventing disease,” Conrad said on stage at WSJD Live. “Fundamentally, our foe is death. Our foe is unnecessary death. Because we have the technology to intervene, and we should expend more energy and effort on it.”

Nanoparticles inside the body will be subject to heavier regulation than a device that uses them outside the body. Google will have to prove to the FDA that their method is safe and effective in large, controlled clinical trials. To do that, they will first have to determine a dose of nanoparticles for use, which the company has not yet done.

The idea behind using nanoparticles to catch cancer and other illnesses is pretty simple. Cancer cells often express proteins or sugars not found on healthy cells; a nanoparticle with a coating that binds cancer-only cells could be a useful tool for diagnosing the disease. There are two barriers here: the first is our knowledge of cancer-specific proteins or sugars; the second is finding out what coatings they would bind to.

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