Golden Globes 2016: The Revenant Wins Big!

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The Revenant took home the award for Best Motion Picture, Drama while The Martian won the award for Best Motion Picture, Comedy at the 2016 Golden Globe Awards on Sunday.

On the drama side, The Revenant beat out Carol, Mad Max: Fury Road, Room andSpotlight.

“I cannot say how surprised I am and how proud I am to have survived this film with all these fellows,” the movie’s director, Alejandro Iñárritu said in his acceptance speech.

The movie’s win came just minutes after the film’s star Leonardo DiCaprio won the award for Best Actor in a Drama Movie.

In the comedy category The Martian beat out The Big Short, Joy, The Martian, Spyand Trainwreck to win the award.

Director Ridley Scott spoke on behalf of the film and during his/her acceptance speech he thanked the film’s star Matt Damon for bringing his “special brand of humor and grace” to the movie.

Best motion picture, drama

“Mad Max: Fury Road”

“Carol”

* “The Revenant”

“Room”

“Spotlight”

Best motion picture, musical or comedy

“Joy”

“Spy”

“The Big Short”

* “The Martian”

“Trainwreck”

Best performance by an actress in a motion picture, drama

Saoirse Ronin, “Brooklyn”

Cate Blanchett, “Carol”

Rooney Mara, “Carol”

* Brie Larson, “Room”

Alicia Vikander, “The Danish Girl”

Best performance by an actress in a motion picture, musical or comedy

* Jennifer Lawrence, “Joy”

Melissa McCarthy, “Spy”

Amy Schumer, “Trainwreck”

Maggie Smith, “The Lady in the Van”

Lily Tomlin, “Grandma”

Best performance by an actor in a motion picture, drama

Bryan Cranston, “Trumbo”

* Leonardo DiCaprio, “The Revenant”

Michael Fassbender, “Steve Jobs”

Eddie Redmayne, “The Danish Girl”

Will Smith, “Concussion”

Best performance by an actor in a supporting role in a motion picture

Paul Dano,” Love”

Idris Elba, “Beasts of No Nation”

Mark Rylance, “Bridge of Spies”

Michael Shannon, “99 Homes”

* Sylvester Stallone, “Creed”

Best performance by actress in a supporting role in a motion picture

Jane Fonda, “Youth”

Jennifer Jason Leigh, “Hateful Eight”

Helen Mirren, “Trumbo”

Alicia Vikander, “Ex Machina”

* Kate Winslet, “Steve Jobs”

Best director, motion picture

* Alejandro González Iñárritu, “The Revenant”

Todd Haynes, “Carol”

Tom McCarthy, “Spotlight”

George Miller, “Mad Max: Fury Road”

Ridley Scott, “The Martian”

Best performance by an actor in a motion picture, musical or comedy

Christian Bale, “The Big Short”

Steve Carell, “The Big Short”

* Matt Damon, “The Martian”

Al Pacino, “Danny Collins”

Mark Ruffalo, “Infinitely Polar Bear”

Best screenplay, motion picture

Emma Donoghue, “Room”

Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer, “Spotlight”

Charles Randolph and Adam McKay, “The Big Short”

* Aaron Sorkin, “Steve Jobs”

Quentin Tarantino, “The Hateful Eight”

Best original score, motion picture

Carter Burwell, “Carol”

Alexander Desplat, “The Danish Girl”

* Ennio Morricone, “The Hateful Eight”

Daniel Pemberton, “Steve Jobs”

Ryuchi Sakamoto, “The Revanant”

Best motion picture, animated

“Anomalisa”

“The Good Dinosaur”

* “Inside Out”

“The Peanuts Movie”

“Shaun the Sheep Movie”

Best original song, motion picture

“Love Me Like You Do,” “Fifty Shades of Grey”

“One Kind of Love,” “Love & Mercy”

“See You Again,” “Furious 7”

“Simple Song #3,” “Youth”

* “Writing’s on the Wall,” “Spectre”

Best motion picture, foreign language

“The Brand New Testament”

“The Club”

“The Fencer”

“Mustang”

* “Son of Saul”

Best television series, drama

“Empire,” Fox

“Game of Thrones,” HBO

* “Mr. Robot,” USA

“Narcos,” Netflix

“Outlander,” Starz

Best television series, musical or comedy

“Casual,” Hulu

* “Mozart in the Jungle,” Amazon Video

“Orange Is the New Black,” Netflix

“Silicon Valley,” HBO

“Transparent,” Amazon Video

“Veep,” HBO

Best television limited series or motion picture made for television

“American Crime,” ABC

“American Horror Story: Hotel,” FX

“Fargo,” FX

“Flesh and Bone,” Starz

* “Wolf Hall,” PBS

Best performance by an actor in a television series, drama

* Jon Hamm, “Mad Men”

Rami Malek, “Mr. Robot”

Wagner Moura, “Narcos”

Bob Odenkirk, “Better Call Saul”

Liev Schreiber, “Ray Donovan”

Best performance by an actor in a television series, musical or comedy

Aziz Ansari, “Master of None”

* Gael García Bernal, “Mozart in the Jungle”

Rob Lowe, “The Grinder”

Patrick Stewart, “Blunt Talk”

Jeffrey Tambor, “Transparent”

Best performance by an actor in a leading role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television

Idris Elba, “Luther”

* Oscar Isaac, “Show Me a Hero”

David Oyelowo, “Nightingale”

Mark Rylance, “Wolf Hall”

Patrick Wilson, “Fargo”

Best performance by an actor in a supporting role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television

Alan Cumming, “The Good Wife”

Damian Lewis, “Wolf Hall”

Ben Mendelson, “Bloodline”

Tobias Menzies, “Outlander”

* Christian Slater, “Mr. Robot”

Best performance by an actress in a TV series, drama

Caitriona Balfe, “Outlander”

Viola Davis, “How to Get Away With Murder”

Eva Green, “Penny Dreadful

* Taraji P. Henson, “Empire”

Robin Wright, “House of Cards”

Best performance by an actress in a supporting role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television

Uzo Aduba, “Orange Is the New Black”

Joanna Froggatt, “Downton Abbey”

Regina King, “American Crime”

Judith Light, “Transparent”

* Maura Tierney, “The Affair”

Best performance by an actress in a leading role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television

Kirsten Dunst, “Fargo”

* Lady Gaga, “American Horror Story: Hotel”

Sarah Hay, “Flesh and Bone”

Felicity Huffman, “American Crime”

Queen Latifah, “Bessie”

Best performance by an actress in a television series, musical or comedy

* Rachel Bloom, “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend”

Jamie Lee Curtis, “Scream Queens”

Julia Louis-Dreyfus, “Veep”

Gina Rodriguez, “Jane the Virgin”

Lily Tomlin, “Grace and Frankie”

Apple adds a Black Ribbon to French Homepage, Google does the same for Beirut and Paris!

Apple has acknowledged the recent terrorism attacks in Paris with a commemorative ribbon on the Apple France homepage, www.apple.com/fr. The black ribbon is a sign of remembrance and mourning; Google has also added the symbol to its homepage in response to the attacks.

In addition, Apple has been contacting affected employees in French Apple retail stores to check they are safe.

Here’s Google’s Ribbon on Lebanon(www.google.com.lb) and France(www.google.fr) Homepages:

Google Black Ribbon Beirut Google Black Ribbon France

Google has made calls to France via its Hangouts service temporarily free. Callers can use the Hangouts app on Android, iOS, and the web to place calls to the country without incurring the normal international charges. The Google+ post making the announcement did not specify any particular countries, so presumably free calls are available from any location where Hangouts can be used. It’s not clear if Google Voice users are also being given free calls.

Note that Skype has joined the team also with free calls to France.

Facebook explains why it enabled Safety Check for Paris but not other recent attacks

  In the immediate aftermath of the Paris attacks on Friday, many with loved ones living in the city received a new type of notification from Facebook. The social network activated a relatively new tool called Safety Check for the attacks, letting people in Paris easily tell their friends and that they were safe.
While the feature has been helpful for many, some pointed to its use in Paris but not for other recent attacks — like a twin suicide bombing that killed over 40 in Beiruit on Thursday — as yet another example of western bias that apparently values certain lives more than others.

On Saturday, Facebook saw fit to respond to those accusations in a blog post written by the company’s vice president of growth, Alex Schultz. In it, Schultz notes that this is the first time the company has enabled Safety Check for anything other than a natural disaster, events which the tool was originally designed for when it was released last year.

Like a natural disaster, he notes, during the attacks “Facebook became a place where people were sharing information and looking to understand the condition of their loved ones.” After discussing with Facebook employees on the ground, the company decided it was a good idea to turn on Safety Check. “There has to be a first time for trying something new, even in complex and sensitive times, and for us that was Paris.”

Now that Facebook has set a precedent for using Safety Check for terrorism and other violent events, it will need to figure out when and where to use the feature. From Schultz’s comments, it’s not clear if the team would have enabled it for Beruit. He includes the Lebanese city among “other parts of the world, where violence is more common and terrible things happen with distressing frequency. ” And he notes that “During an ongoing crisis, like war or epidemic, Safety Check in its current form is not that useful for people: because there isn’t a clear start or end point and, unfortunately, it’s impossible to know when someone is truly ‘safe.'”

That said, Schultz writes that “We want this tool to be available whenever and wherever it can help,” adding, “We will learn a lot from feedback on this launch.”