Samsung Galaxy S7 revealed in new Leaked images!

samsung galaxy S7 edge leak

What could be leaked images of the Samsung Galaxy S7 have been released, just under a fortnight ahead of the upcoming flagship smartphone’s official launch.

One image, released by Vietnamese tech website ReviewDao, appears to show the back of the device, but unfortunately doesn’t give too much away.One of the leaked images was published by Vietnamese tech site ReviewDao

We can’t confirm much about the phone’s rumoured specs from the image, but SamMobile pointed out the camera does appear to be a little more flush with the back plate than it was in the S6, potentially proving one of the many S7 rumours right.

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It also looks like the back is plastic, and not glass, as has been rumoured – however, according to SamMobile this phone may only be a prototype, so we shouldn’t take it as an accurate impression of how the final phone will look.

You can catch a glimpse of the metal frame on the sides of the device, however, which is apparently magnesium and not aluminium, according to rumours.

Another leaked image, which was released around the same time on Chinese social network Weibo, purports to show the front of the S7 Edge, the larger, curved-screen version of the phone, which will likely be released alongside the standard model on 21 February.

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The image shows the phone displaying the results of an AnTuTu benchmark test, which labels the phone as an SM-G9350, which earlier leaks have claimed is the S7 Edge’s model number.

The benchmarking result, which reflects the phone’s technical performance, is 134704, which is what could be expected for a phone with the S7’s rumoured specs.

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The images don’t reveal too much by themselves, but they could have confirmed a few stories about the long-awaited phone.

The Galaxy S7 is due to be unveiled at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona on Sunday 21 February, in an event which starts at 6PM GMT

Google Chrome will soon run much faster thanks to Brotli!

New Google Logo Sept 2015

Chrome is about to load web pages a lot faster than you’ve experienced up until now. A new compression algorithm called Brotli will help making this possible. Google introduced Brotli last September, with it Chrome will be able to compress data up to 26% more than its existing compression engine, Zopfli, which is an impressive jump.

According to Google’s web performance engineer Ilya Grigorik, Brotli is ready to roll out, so Chrome users should expect to see a bump in load times once the next version of Chrome is released in the coming days or weeks.

Google also says Brotli will help mobile Chrome users experience “lower data transfer fees and reduced battery use.” The company is hailing Brotli as “a new data format” that Google hopes will be adopted by other web browsers in the near future.

Firefox seemingly next in line to adopt it. But for now, expect to notice your web pages loading a bit faster in the coming weeks.

WhatsApp is now free and promises to stay ad-free

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WhatsApp is dropping its subscription fees to access the popular messaging service. WhatsApp introduced the fees a few years ago, forcing new users to pay an annual 99 cents subscription after the first year. “As we’ve grown, we’ve found that this approach hasn’t worked well,” admits WhatsApp in a company blog post today.

“Many WhatsApp users don’t have a debit or credit card number and they worried they’d lose access to their friends and family after their first year. So over the next several weeks, we’ll remove fees from the different versions of our app and WhatsApp will no longer charge you for our service.”

If you’ve been using WhatsApp for the six years it has been available then you’ve probably never experienced the subscription fees. Most original users were granted a free lifetime service, but in recent years the company introduced its subscription to new users. Recode reports that if you’ve already paid the 99 cents for the year then there won’t be a refund, but subscription fees will cease immediately.

WhatsApp now has nearly 1 billion users, so the free timing removes the barrier for millions more to join the messaging service. The Facebook-owned service plans appears to be planning to generate revenue through services to businesses. “We will test tools that allow you to use WhatsApp to communicate with businesses and organizations that you want to hear from.” That means you might be able to send WhatsApp messages to your bank or airlines in the future. WhatsApp isn’t planning to enable third-party ads within the service, and it’s sticking to its original principles. The founders of WhatsApp were strongly opposed to ads, noting back in 2012 that “when advertising is involved you the user are the product.”

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Dual-core iPhone 6s named top performer of 2015, crushing octa-core Android rivals

iPhone 6s and 6s Plus

Raw hardware specs aren’t everything. What’s far more important is how well a phone’s software works with its hardware, as AnTuTu’s new hardware performance rankings demonstrate. The popular benchmarking site has posted its list of the ten best performing smartphones of 2015 and the iPhone 6s absolutely crushes everything in its path despite “only” having a dual-core processor and 2GB of RAM.

Just look at this chart:

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As you can see, the iPhone 6s destroys devices that have octacore processors and 4GB of RAM in AnTuTu’s performance benchmarks. All told, the iPhone 6s’s score is 59% higher than the Galaxy Note 5 and 69% higher than the Nexus 6P. The Huawei Mate 8 comes the closest to matching the iPhone 6s’s performance but even that device is a long way off from Apple’s 2015 flagship phone. In fact, the rankings show that even 2014’s iPhone 6 still performs better than some 2015 Android devices including the OnePlus 2 and the Nexus 6P.

What’s particularly intriguing here is the comparatively poor performance of the Nexus 6P. Unlike other Android devices on the market, the Nexus 6P uses the stock version of Android and features hardware that was designed with Google’s input. It seems strange that it would perform worse than devices that are encumbered by carrier and OEM bloatware like the Galaxy Note 5.

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