Golden Globes 2016: The Revenant Wins Big!

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The Revenant took home the award for Best Motion Picture, Drama while The Martian won the award for Best Motion Picture, Comedy at the 2016 Golden Globe Awards on Sunday.

On the drama side, The Revenant beat out Carol, Mad Max: Fury Road, Room andSpotlight.

“I cannot say how surprised I am and how proud I am to have survived this film with all these fellows,” the movie’s director, Alejandro Iñárritu said in his acceptance speech.

The movie’s win came just minutes after the film’s star Leonardo DiCaprio won the award for Best Actor in a Drama Movie.

In the comedy category The Martian beat out The Big Short, Joy, The Martian, Spyand Trainwreck to win the award.

Director Ridley Scott spoke on behalf of the film and during his/her acceptance speech he thanked the film’s star Matt Damon for bringing his “special brand of humor and grace” to the movie.

Best motion picture, drama

“Mad Max: Fury Road”

“Carol”

* “The Revenant”

“Room”

“Spotlight”

Best motion picture, musical or comedy

“Joy”

“Spy”

“The Big Short”

* “The Martian”

“Trainwreck”

Best performance by an actress in a motion picture, drama

Saoirse Ronin, “Brooklyn”

Cate Blanchett, “Carol”

Rooney Mara, “Carol”

* Brie Larson, “Room”

Alicia Vikander, “The Danish Girl”

Best performance by an actress in a motion picture, musical or comedy

* Jennifer Lawrence, “Joy”

Melissa McCarthy, “Spy”

Amy Schumer, “Trainwreck”

Maggie Smith, “The Lady in the Van”

Lily Tomlin, “Grandma”

Best performance by an actor in a motion picture, drama

Bryan Cranston, “Trumbo”

* Leonardo DiCaprio, “The Revenant”

Michael Fassbender, “Steve Jobs”

Eddie Redmayne, “The Danish Girl”

Will Smith, “Concussion”

Best performance by an actor in a supporting role in a motion picture

Paul Dano,” Love”

Idris Elba, “Beasts of No Nation”

Mark Rylance, “Bridge of Spies”

Michael Shannon, “99 Homes”

* Sylvester Stallone, “Creed”

Best performance by actress in a supporting role in a motion picture

Jane Fonda, “Youth”

Jennifer Jason Leigh, “Hateful Eight”

Helen Mirren, “Trumbo”

Alicia Vikander, “Ex Machina”

* Kate Winslet, “Steve Jobs”

Best director, motion picture

* Alejandro González Iñárritu, “The Revenant”

Todd Haynes, “Carol”

Tom McCarthy, “Spotlight”

George Miller, “Mad Max: Fury Road”

Ridley Scott, “The Martian”

Best performance by an actor in a motion picture, musical or comedy

Christian Bale, “The Big Short”

Steve Carell, “The Big Short”

* Matt Damon, “The Martian”

Al Pacino, “Danny Collins”

Mark Ruffalo, “Infinitely Polar Bear”

Best screenplay, motion picture

Emma Donoghue, “Room”

Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer, “Spotlight”

Charles Randolph and Adam McKay, “The Big Short”

* Aaron Sorkin, “Steve Jobs”

Quentin Tarantino, “The Hateful Eight”

Best original score, motion picture

Carter Burwell, “Carol”

Alexander Desplat, “The Danish Girl”

* Ennio Morricone, “The Hateful Eight”

Daniel Pemberton, “Steve Jobs”

Ryuchi Sakamoto, “The Revanant”

Best motion picture, animated

“Anomalisa”

“The Good Dinosaur”

* “Inside Out”

“The Peanuts Movie”

“Shaun the Sheep Movie”

Best original song, motion picture

“Love Me Like You Do,” “Fifty Shades of Grey”

“One Kind of Love,” “Love & Mercy”

“See You Again,” “Furious 7”

“Simple Song #3,” “Youth”

* “Writing’s on the Wall,” “Spectre”

Best motion picture, foreign language

“The Brand New Testament”

“The Club”

“The Fencer”

“Mustang”

* “Son of Saul”

Best television series, drama

“Empire,” Fox

“Game of Thrones,” HBO

* “Mr. Robot,” USA

“Narcos,” Netflix

“Outlander,” Starz

Best television series, musical or comedy

“Casual,” Hulu

* “Mozart in the Jungle,” Amazon Video

“Orange Is the New Black,” Netflix

“Silicon Valley,” HBO

“Transparent,” Amazon Video

“Veep,” HBO

Best television limited series or motion picture made for television

“American Crime,” ABC

“American Horror Story: Hotel,” FX

“Fargo,” FX

“Flesh and Bone,” Starz

* “Wolf Hall,” PBS

Best performance by an actor in a television series, drama

* Jon Hamm, “Mad Men”

Rami Malek, “Mr. Robot”

Wagner Moura, “Narcos”

Bob Odenkirk, “Better Call Saul”

Liev Schreiber, “Ray Donovan”

Best performance by an actor in a television series, musical or comedy

Aziz Ansari, “Master of None”

* Gael García Bernal, “Mozart in the Jungle”

Rob Lowe, “The Grinder”

Patrick Stewart, “Blunt Talk”

Jeffrey Tambor, “Transparent”

Best performance by an actor in a leading role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television

Idris Elba, “Luther”

* Oscar Isaac, “Show Me a Hero”

David Oyelowo, “Nightingale”

Mark Rylance, “Wolf Hall”

Patrick Wilson, “Fargo”

Best performance by an actor in a supporting role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television

Alan Cumming, “The Good Wife”

Damian Lewis, “Wolf Hall”

Ben Mendelson, “Bloodline”

Tobias Menzies, “Outlander”

* Christian Slater, “Mr. Robot”

Best performance by an actress in a TV series, drama

Caitriona Balfe, “Outlander”

Viola Davis, “How to Get Away With Murder”

Eva Green, “Penny Dreadful

* Taraji P. Henson, “Empire”

Robin Wright, “House of Cards”

Best performance by an actress in a supporting role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television

Uzo Aduba, “Orange Is the New Black”

Joanna Froggatt, “Downton Abbey”

Regina King, “American Crime”

Judith Light, “Transparent”

* Maura Tierney, “The Affair”

Best performance by an actress in a leading role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television

Kirsten Dunst, “Fargo”

* Lady Gaga, “American Horror Story: Hotel”

Sarah Hay, “Flesh and Bone”

Felicity Huffman, “American Crime”

Queen Latifah, “Bessie”

Best performance by an actress in a television series, musical or comedy

* Rachel Bloom, “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend”

Jamie Lee Curtis, “Scream Queens”

Julia Louis-Dreyfus, “Veep”

Gina Rodriguez, “Jane the Virgin”

Lily Tomlin, “Grace and Frankie”

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 Tops Thanksgiving Box Office

Box Office: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 Wins Thanksgiving Weekend.

The box office had a nice bump as the Thanksgiving weekend saw three movies gross more than $40 million over the five-day extended weekend, although Lionsgate’s The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 still dominated over all of them with an additional $75.8 million and $51.6 million over the three-day weekend, down 50% from its opening. That’s a better hold than Mockingjay Part 1, which earned $57 million over Thanksgiving last year, down 53% from its bigger opening. After ten days, it has grossed $198 million at the domestic box office, which is down from where Part 1 was at with $225.7 million in the same time frame. 

Disney•Pixar released their second movie of 2015, The Good Dinosaur, into 3,749 theaters on Wednesday and after earning $9.8 million on Wednesday and dropping on Thanksgiving day, it picked up steam for the weekend with an estimated $39.1 million over the three days and $55.6 million including Wednesday and Thursday. That weekend opening is the lowest for a Pixar Animation film since 1998’s A Bug’s Life, which grossed $33 million over the Thanksgiving weekend (after an exclusive release in a single theater the week before). Even so, it scored the fourth-biggest Thanksgiving opening for both the three-day and five-day time frames, and it should continue to do well as the only family film for the next few weeks, having received an “A” rating from audiences polled by CinemaScore.

The Good Dinosaur took in an additional $28.7 million internationally in 39 territories with the UK scoring the biggest amount with $4.3 million, followed by Mexico and France.

Fruitvale Station director Ryan Coogler reteamed with Michael B. Jordan for MGM and Warner Bros. Pictures’ Creed, putting Sylvester Stallone in the role of Rocky Balboa for the seventh time, and it became one of the biggest surprise holiday hits. Released into 3,404 theaters on Wednesday, it scored $1.6 million in previews, which amounted to a $6 million opening day, but it built on that for a higher Thursday, and it’s estimated to gross $30.1 million over the three-day weekend. That’s more than the $20 million opening for Rocky IV over Thanksgiving weekend thirty years ago, although it’s not that impressive when you take into consideration thirty years of ticket price inflation. Even so, the movie ended up well above expectations with an estimated $42.6 million over the five-day weekend and it should continue to perform strong over the next few weeks going by the “A” CinemaScore.

MGM Studios also took fourth place with the 24th James Bond movie SPECTRE (Sony), which took in an estimated $12.8 million over the three-day weekend (just a 15% drop from last weekend) with $18.2 million grossed over the five-day holiday. It has earned $176.1 million in North America, which is more than the total gross for Daniel Craig’s first two Bond films, Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace, but less than the $221 million that the previous Bond film, Skyfall, had grossed by the end of Thanksgiving weekend in 2012.

20th Century Fox and Blue Sky Studios‘ animated The Peanuts Movie collected another $9.7 million over the three-day weekend, down 27% from last weekend to take fifth place, with $13.6 million over the five days and $117 million grossed so far domestically.

Sony Pictures’ R-rated holiday comedy The Night Before, starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Seth Rogen and Anthony Mackie and directed by Jonathan Levine (50/50), took sixth place with $8.2 million (down 17%) in three days and $11.5 million Wednesday and Thursday. Its $24 million domestic gross is just shy of the film’s reported $25 million production budget.

STX Entertainment‘s thriller Secret in Their Eyes, starring Julia Roberts, Chiwetel Ejiofor and Nicole Kidman, also dropped two places to seventh with $6 million over the five-day weekend and $14 million total.

It was neck and neck with the ensemble drama Spotlight (Open Road), starring Michael Keaton, Mark Ruffalo, Rachel McAdams, Liev Schreiber and Stanley Tucci, which expanded nationwide into 897 theaters where it brought int $5.7 million over the five-day weekend and $4.5 million over three. It has grossed $12.3 million to date.

The Saoirse Ronan drama Brooklyn (Fox Searchlight) also expanded nationwide into 845 theaters which allowed it to move into the Top 10 to ninth place with an estimated $4.9 million over the five-day weekend. It has earned $7.3 million since opening in select cities a few weeks back.

Ridley Scott’s The Martian (20th Century Fox), starring Matt Damon, retained a place in the Top 10 for the ninth weekend in a row with $4.5 million over the five-day weekend and $3.3 million Friday through Sunday. It has earned $219 million to date, making it one of the year’s blockbuster hits.

The big bomb of the weekend and probably among the biggest bombs for Thanksgiving releases was 20th Century Fox’s Victor Frankenstein, starring Daniel Radcliffe and James McAvoy, which grossed an estimated $3.5 million in 2,795 theaters over the five-day weekend, just $1,234 per theater. It’s ironic that it fared worse than The Martian in its ninth weekend, considering that the movies swapped release dates earlier in the year. It also grossed less than Brooklyn in its expansion into 2,000 less theaters.

It may not be surprising, but the Thanksgiving Top 10 was up around $10 million from the same time last year when DreamWorks Animation’s animated spin-off The Penguins of Madagascaropened in second place with $36 million over the five days and the comedy sequel Horrible Bosses had to settle for fifth place with $23 million.

Focus Features’ period drama The Danish Girl, starring Eddie Redmayne, Alicia Vikander, Amber Heard, Matthias Schoenaerts and Ben Whishaw, opened in four theaters in New York and L.A. where it grossed $185,000, or $46,250 per theater. According to exit surveys, 58% of the audience was female and 67% over 40.

Todd Haynes’ period drama Carol (The Weinstein Company), starring Cate Blanchett, Rooney Mara and Kyle Chandler, held decently in its second weekend, still playing just four theaters in New York and L.A., and it added another $203 thousand for a $588,000 total. One expects that The Weinstein Company will expand the film into more theaters and eventually wide by year’s end.

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James Bond ‘Spectre’ Number one with $73 million Opening Weekend!

SPECTRE

The new James Bond film “Spectre” was No. 1 at the box office and opened to an estimated $73 million in the U.S. and Canada. That’s the second biggest debut in the James Bond series, but well behind 2012’s “Skyfall,” which also starred Daniel Craig and was directed by Sam Mendes and took in $88.4 million its first weekend.

James Bond Spectre Range Rover

Early international returns have broken records in Europe, particularly the United Kingdom, indicating that Americans are a little cooler on Bond’s latest big screen foray. The movie may have been impacted by many negative reviews, a change from “Skyfall.”

Distributor Sony Pictures Entertainment and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. spent about $250 million to make “Spectre,” vs. $209 million on “Skyfall.”

The weekend’s other new film playing nationwide was “The Peanuts Movie,” an animated return to the screen for Charlie Brown and his friends. With largely positive reviews, it opened at No. 2 with $45 million, a good but not great number for a franchise that’s new to most kids.

SPECTRE

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials tops Weekend Box Office!

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While the box office is still doing pretty decently for September, two of the weekend’s widest new releases didn’t fare as well as hoped and expected while a number of more moderate and limited releases took business away from both of them.

The sequel to last year’s $100 million young adult hit The Maze Runner, 20th Century Fox’s Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials, reunited director Wes Ball with Dylan O’Brien, Kaya Scodelario and Thomas Brodie-Sangster, as they were joined by the likes of Giancarlo Esposito, Aidan Gillen, Nathalie Emmanuel, Rosa Salazar and more for the adaptation of James Dashner’s second novel in the series.

It opened with $11 million on Friday including $1.4 million from Thursday previews, which in both cases was less than the opening for The Maze Runner a year ago this weekend, and according to Sunday estimates, it will end up with $30.3 million, which is less than the $32.5 million opening of its predecessor. While this might be surprising since The Maze Runner is one of the better received young adult adaptations (even though it didn’t quite achieve the numbers of The Twilight Saga or The Hunger Games), it’s also continuing the current trend that audiences just aren’t into sequels as much as they have been in the past. It also had a lot more competition for any potential male audience from a number of new releases mentioned below and its reviews and “B+” CinemaScore weren’t as strong as the original movie either.

The other big movie opening on Thursday night was Warner Bros.’ crime-drama Black Mass, starring Johnny Depp as notorious Boston criminal “Whitey” Bulger. Directed by Scott Cooper (Out of the Furnace) and co-starring Joel Edgerton, Dakota Johnson, Julianne Nicholson, Rory Cochrane, Kevin Bacon and many more, it opened with an estimated $23.4 million in 3,188 theaters. That was below most expectations and projections for the weekend that thought it would open closer to $30 million and possibly give “The Scorch Trials” a run for the top spot, but it was still able to average $7,327 per theater. According to estimates, that’s still less than Ben Affleck’s Boston-based crime-thriller The Town opened with on the same weekend in 2010, but it received a respectable CinemaScore of “B” with 56% of its audience being male and 89% over the age of 26, according to exit polls, and it could sustain its business from opening weekend buzz despite having direct competition in the coming weeks.

Dropping to third place, M. Night Shyamalan’s low-budget horror flick The Visit took in $11.4 million in its second weekend, down 55% from its opening weekend as the highest-opening horror movie of 2015. It has grossed $42.4 million so far, which isn’t bad for a movie that was produced for $5 million with low-budget masters Blumhouse Productions.

Screen Gems’ thriller The Perfect Guy, starring Sanaa Lathan, Michael Ealy and Morris Chestnut, also took a tumble in its second weekend, dropping 63% from its #1 opening to fourth place with $9.7 million and $41.4 million total to date.

Universal’s ensemble adventure-drama Everest, directed by Balthasar Kormakur (Contraband) and starring Jason Clarke, Josh Brolin, John Hawkes, Jake Gyllenhaal, Emily Watson and Keira Knightley, opened in 545 IMAX 3D and other large format theaters and had an estimated opening weekend of $7.6 million, a strong $13,736 per theater, to take fifth place, which bodes well for its nationwide expansion on Friday. $6 million of that amount was grossed in 366 North American IMAX theaters surpassing The Equalizer‘s September IMAX opening record of roughly half that amount.

Internationally, Everest opened in 36 territories and brought in $28.2 million on 4,690 screens as the #1 movie in 12 of those markets, including Australia, Argentina, India, Mexico and Kormakur’s home country of Iceland. Next week, it will add 22 more territories on top of its North American expansion.

The hit faith-based family drama War Room (Sony/TriStar) is now the 5th-highest grossing faith-based film with $49.2 million after adding another $6.3 million in 1,945 theaters. It dropped from third to sixth place despite having a negligible drop-off of 19% in its fourth weekend.

The rest of the Top 10 grossed less than $3 million, with Broad Green Pictures’ A Walk in the Woods, starring Robert Redford and Nick Nolte, taking seventh place, followed by Tom Cruise’s Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation (Paramount Pictures) and Universal’s rap biopic Straight Outta Compton, holding onto its Top 10 spot as it became the highest-grossing film by a black director with $159 million, surpassing Keenen Ivory Wayans’ Scary Movie, which grossed $157 million in 2000.

Sony Pictures Classics expanded Paul Weitz’s Grandma, starring Lily Tomlin and Julia Garner, into a nationwide release of 1,021 theaters on Friday, and it ended up with $1.6 million or $1,557 per theater for the weekend, showing another weak expansion for the indie film subsidiary.

Paramount Pictures’ attempt to capitalize on the success of recent faith-based films backfired (maybe because that audience was well-sated by War Room), but they still released the drama Captive, starring David Oyelowo and Kate Mara, into 806 theaters, where it grossed $1.4 million or just $1,737 per theater, which wasn’t enough to get into the Top 10.

Although The Scorch Trials opened lower than last year’s The Maze Runner, the box office was still up from this weekend last year as the Top 10 grossed an estimated $97 million, which was up roughly $7 million from the Top 10 last year.

Lionsgate decided to give Denis Villeneuve’s Mexican cartel crime-thriller Sicario, starring Emily Blunt, Josh Brolin and Benicio Del Toro, a platform release ahead of its wide release on October 2, and it did quite well, grossing an estimated $390,000 in 6 theaters in New York and Los Angeles. That’s a location average of $65,000 per theater, which is probably one of the best per-theater averages this year.

As far as other limited releases, Alchemy’s Meet the Patels from Geeta and Ravi Patel opened in 34 theaters on Friday where it grossed $253,000, or $4,707 per theater. Bleecker Street’s release of Pawn Sacrifice, starring Tobey Maguire as chess master Bobby Fischer, co-starring Liev Schreiber, Peter Saarsgard and Michael Stuhlbarg, opened similarly in 33 theaters where it grossed slightly less with $207,000 but with a higher $6,269 per theater.

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