Here’s what we’ve been Googling this year, Google’s Year in Search review 2014!

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Google just released its annual retrospective on what the world was searching for in 2014. The company has apparently given up on calling its year in review the Google Zeitgeist and opted for the more humble “Year in Search .” The lists include everything from top trending overall searches to top trending GIFs.

The story behind the story: Although it’s stopped using the moniker, Zeitgeist was an entirely appropriate name for Google’s yearly top trending search lists. As the most popular search engine in the world, Google has a special insight into what the world is thinking about at any given time. Google has used this ability to track flu hotspots (albeit with reportedly mixed results ) and aid in disasters. At the end of the calendar year, it’s always interesting to see what the world was most fascinated with during the previous twelve months.

What topped the lists

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The tragic death of Robin Williams, who took his own life in August, topped both the global and U.S. top trending searches for 2014. Williams was followed by the World Cup, Ebola, and the Malaysia Airlines disaster in both the U.S. and the overall global searches.

Once you leave the top four the global and U.S. search lists begin to diverge in placement, but not a whole lot on topics. Overall, Google’s global user base was fascinated with the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, Flappy Bird, ISIS, Frozen, and the Sochi Olympics. Conchita Wurst, the Austrian drag queen who won the Eurovision talent contest in May, was also a big search around the world.

Wurst and this year’s Winter Olympics weren’t top searches in the U.S., but Ferguson and the ongoing troubles in Ukraine were.

Things got a little more interesting when it came to tech.

The world was largely focused on smartphones in 2014. Seven of the top 10 spots were taken up by handset including the iPhone 6  (#1), Samsung Galaxy S5  (#2), Nexus 6 (#3), Moto G  (#4), Galaxy Note 4  (#5), LG G3  (#6), and Nokia X  (#7).

The U.S., on the other hand, was a little more interested in the Apple Watch (#4),Chromecast (#5), Xbox One (#6), and the Surface Pro 3 (#10). Smartphones were still a big chunk of top trending gadget searches in the U.S., however, occupying six spots.

The world was also interested in the Xbox One, which came in at number 7 on the global trending list. Sony’s PlayStation 4, however, did not crack the top 10 on either the global or U.S. trending lists. Sony’s console has led the sales contest between the two next-gen consoles, but the Xbox One recently won a small victory when it overtook the new PlayStation in terms of sales for the month of November.

It appears Sony may have had the sales for most of 2014, but the hearts of gamers and tech fans were still with Microsoft’s console.

The complete tech lists are below. Check out Google’s Year in Search site  to explore all the other lists for global results and a country-by-country breakdown.

Top Trending Searches, Global:

3. Ebola
8. ISIS
9. Frozen

Top Trending Consumer Electronics, Global:

  1. iPhone 6
  2. Samsung Galaxy S5
  3. Nexus 6
  4. Moto G
  5. Samsung Note 4
  6. LG G3
  7. Xbox One
  8. Apple Watch
  9. Nokia X
  10. iPad Air

Robin Williams Found Dead at Home!

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Robin Williams, who died Monday at age 63, harnessed his zany comic persona to become one of Hollywood’s most celebrated and bankable movie stars.
Mr. Williams was found dead at his home in Tiburon, Calif., just north of San Francisco, according to the Marin County Sheriff’s Office.

The apparent cause of death was suicide by asphyxiation, although an investigation is continuing.
Emergency personnel found Mr. Williams inside the house he shared with his wife, Susan Schneider, after a 911 call reported a man unconscious and not breathing. The sheriff’s office said Mr. Williams was last seen alive at 10 p.m. on Sunday.
Mr. Williams’s high energy at times masked a personal struggle with alcohol and drug addiction, and a representative for the actor said Monday that “he has been battling severe depression of late.”
After starting his career in stand-up comedy and bursting into public consciousness in 1978 with the hit television comedy “Mork & Mindy,” Mr. Williams built an acting career that included a mix of over-the-top star vehicles like “Mrs. Doubtfire” and “The Birdcage,” along with well-received roles in dramas including “Awakenings” and “Insomnia.”
He was nominated for four Oscars, winning best supporting actor for his role as a therapist to a troubled young math genius in “Good Will Hunting,” which was released in 1997. “This might be the one time I’m speechless,” he said upon accepting the award.
Since his days on “Mork & Mindy,” a fish-out-of-water tale that ran for four seasons in which he played an alien from the planet Ork, Mr. Williams demonstrated a fully formed comedic style filled with tics and habits that would become his trademarks.
Those idiosyncrasies, like monologues full of non sequiturs or unexpected accents, would help him quickly become one of the world’s biggest comedy stars and a favorite guest of late-night television talk shows. Even when not pictured on screen, Mr. Williams had a tendency to become the center of attention, including a celebrated turn as the voice of the madcap genie in the 1992 animated film “Aladdin.”
In 1986, he worked with fellow comedians Whoopi Goldberg and Billy Crystal to start Comic Relief Inc., a charity that raises money for the homeless. Together, they hosted an annual comedy fundraiser for more than a decade, reuniting in 2006 to raise money for people displaced by Hurricane Katrina.

But Mr. Williams surprised many fans who thought of him as “Mork from Ork” by harnessing his manic energy into a string of more dramatic roles. Beginning with 1987’s “Good Morning, Vietnam,” he was nominated for a best actor Oscar three times in five years, with nominations also for “Dead Poets Society” and “The Fisher King.”
Mr. Williams’s acting career slowed in the past decade. He starred in the short-lived series “The Crazy Ones,” which was canceled in May. He recently played the role of Teddy Roosevelt in the family comedy “Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb,” which will be released in December.
“As he is remembered, it is our hope the focus will not be on Robin’s death, but on the countless moments of joy and laughter he gave to millions,” said Ms. Schneider, his wife.