The new “Top Gear” will be called “Gear Knobs” aired on Amazon Prime?

Top Gear in Australia

Speculation is mounting that Jeremy Clarkson’s new Amazon Prime show be called Gear Knobs, after BuzzFeed discovered a trademark application for the cheeky title by Clarkson’s lawyers, Olswang.

The application was made a fortnight before the former Top Gear presenter announced a deal worth a reported £160m to make a new series with Amazon. It was filed through a shell company, which has also registered the title “Gear Knobs”.

Top Gear in Canada

A third title – Speedbirds – was also registered by the lawyers. The Daily Mirror wonders if this name could be new moniker for “a Stig-like character in Clarkson, Hammond and May’s new show”. The filings mean the titles can be used for TV shows and merchandising.

The Top Gear brand was worth an estimated £150m a year in sales to the BBC through a lucrative combination of live shows, DVD sales, and all manner of branded merchandise, including Stig bubble bath and Top Gear birthday cakes.

Top Gear team

However, the risqué names may not be what Amazon has in mind. Although the applications were made in the middle of July, at the end of August the company’s boss Roy Price said the team were still struggling to find a name for the show.

When asked about the reported new title, an Amazon spokesman said: “Amazon does not comment on speculation.” Clarkson himself was unavailable for comment on the story.

Richard Hammond, James May and Jeremy Clarkson

Earlier this week, his sidekick James May tweeted a photograph of himself with the caption “Here I am again, looking like a nob.”

Before he begins work on his new show, Clarkson will return to the BBC as host of an episode of the satirical news quiz Have I Got News For You.

Evans

It will be his first appearance on the BBC since he was dropped from Top Gear after punching producer Oisin Tymon, says BBC News.

After a protracted investigation into the incident, BBC director-general Tony Hall decided not to renew the presenter’s contract, saying that “a line has been crossed” and “there cannot be one rule for one and one rule for another”.

Jeremy Clarkson and Chris Evans on TFI Friday

Clarkson’s appearance on Have I Got News For You will coincide with the start of the show’s 50th series.

The 55-year-old presenter had been due to host an episode of the show in April, but pulled out after the so-called ‘fracas’ that cost him his job at Top Gear.

At the time, a statement from production company Hat Trick said: “On reflection, Jeremy Clarkson has decided not to host Have I Got News For You. We fully expect him to resume his hosting duties later in the year.”

Jeremy Clarkson - Hovervan

Meanwhile, Sky has taken a much firmer line on the prospect of working with Clarkson in the future.

Stuart Murphy, the broadcaster’s entertainment chief, said that he had a ten-second conversation with his colleagues about whether they would like to employ Clarkson after he was dropped by the BBC. But “who nowadays is happy” working with someone who used the n-word, he asked an audience at the Royal Television Society convention last week, The Guardian reports.

Clarkson once mumbled the word while reciting the nursery rhyme Eeny, meeny, miny, moe during an episode of Top Gear.

Jeremy Clarkson - P45

“His view was it wasn’t transmitted,” said Murphy. “Come on. There’s no need to say that. For him to be so tentative about his apology and loving the fact that he’s a naughty schoolboy. Grow up. It’s a different age, grow up.”

The upshot of Murphy’s short conversation with his colleagues was that none of them were happy to employ Clarkson.

“We are a family brand,” said Murphy. “It would have been short-term gain for long-term mess. He’s not someone we want to work with.”

Clarkson is currently on holiday, but is expected to begin preliminary work on his Amazon show in the next few months.

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Discovery Channel reveals ‘Survival Live’ it’s like a real-life ‘Hunger Games’

Discovery Channel is putting on a real life Hunger Games. At least that’s what the network’s new show, Survival Live (WT) sounds like to me — without the killing, of course. Eight contestants will compete for 42 days in the wilderness on what the network is billing as the first-ever live broadcast survival show.

The network describes it as a, “24/7 real time, multi-platform viewing experience where viewers will play a large role in each survivalist’s success or failure. The survivalists struggle will be streamed live, day and night, from the moment they are abandoned into the remote wilderness with only the clothes on their back. Viewers will have the ability to check out the survivalists biometric data to see who is physically struggling, and can elect to help them out. The survivalists will be able to build a relationship with the audience by talking to them through the cameras. That relationship could be the difference between failing to succeed on the first week or making it the full 42 days. To prosper, these survivalists will need the audience in their corner if they want to stay alive.”

In addition to pre-recorded episodes, there will be live ones where the weakest survivalist will be “extracted,” based on “how well they have demonstrated their skills and how well they have maintained themselves physically,” according to the network. At the end of 42 days, only one will remain.

Frankly, this set-up gives me the heebie-jeebies. (In my head I’m saying this like King Julian.) It sounds just a touch sinister…but these people are competing willingly, and it’s not actually deadly. Discovery is no stranger to survival shows: Naked and AfraidDual Survival, and Bear Grylls: Escape from Hell…who knew there were so many ways to strand people in the wild with video cameras? But, this one sounds like something you won’t want to miss, so be ready for it to hit later this year.

The Hollywood Reporter, who first broke the news, spoke to Eileen O’Neill, group president of Discovery and TLC Networks, who said that the show would likely be filmed somewhere in the Pacific Rim. I hope it’s somewhere balmy.