Top 10 Most Viewed “Adele – Hello” Covers on Youtube!

Adele-Hello

Right after Adele posted her new hit song “Hello” on Youtube; fans, artists and Youtube singers from around the world started uploading covers of the song.

As of this moment, the original video has almost 298 Million views, but the covers are getting a bigger hype, and the following are the best covers on Youtube sorted by the number of views:

Top 1: 7 Million Views in 4 Days

Top 2: 6.7 Million Views in 1 Week

Top 3: 2.3 Million Views in 1 Week

Top 4: 1.5 Million Views in 2 Weeks

Featured: 680K in 2 Days! Noel Kharman – Hello Fairouz Mashup!

Top 5: 900K in 1 Week

Top 6: 860K in 1 Week

Top 7: 740K in 3 Days

Top 8: 640K in 2 Weeks

Top 9: 630K in 1 Week

Top 10: 570K in 1 Week

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Every Month 1.39 Billion People connect on Facebook, 700M on WhatsApp and 300M on Instagram!

Facebook’s efforts on smaller screens are paying off big.

More than half a billion Facebook users access the site only from mobile devices, Facebook revealed as part of an earnings presentation Wednesday. The social network has 1.19 billion total mobile monthly active users, as of the end of 2014, up 26% year-over-year.

All that mobile traffic has meant a big advertising windfall for Facebook. The company made $3.59 billion from advertising overall in the fourth quarter of 2014, and 69% of that came from mobile ads rather than their desktop cousins. That means Facebook made nearly $2.5 billion on mobile ads in three months—a 53% improvement year-over-year. It was also the first quarter Facebook’s mobile ad revenue beat the $2 billion mark.

facebook-and-instagram-connect

Strong mobile numbers like these are vital for Facebook and other companies with ad-based business models. Internet users are increasingly flocking from browsing on PCs, where banner ads have long reigned, to using mobile browsers and apps, where traditional online ads haven’t worked as well.

Facebook and companies like it have been working hard to figure out how to adjust and make mobile ads that will actually click. The latest of Facebook’s mobile experiments is a platform launched in October that lets brands tap into the social giant’s vast troves of user data to advertise to Facebook users while they’re in other apps.

As an example, a Facebook user playing Candy Crush might get served up an in-game ad for toothpaste based on the user’s Facebook activity. Advertisers benefit from getting access to Facebook’s data, while Facebook increases its ad revenue without putting more ads on its own products. While Facebook’s fourth-quarter numbers are clearly evidence the company’s own mobile app is doing just fine, they’re also a sign this new network is off to a speedy start.

YouTube paid subscriptions now live, starting at 99 cents per month

We knew it was in the works and today marks launch day for YouTube’s paid subscription pilot program. Users were worried that their favorite YouTube channels would be switching to the paid model, but from the looks of the pilot channels, there isn’t too much worry about that. Instead, the paid subscription channels are dominated by names you wouldn’t expect to see (legally) on YouTube, like Sesame Street.

The current lineup of channels in the pilot program fall mostly into a few major categories. Of the 53 pilot channels, most seem to be either children’s programming (Jim Henson’s Family TV, National Geographic Kids, DHX Junior/Kids, Franklin), or sports/fitness (TNA Impact Wrestling, UFC Select, PGA Academy, Primezone Sports with Deion Sanders, iAmplify, Cars TV). The rest are a smattering of genre channels covering documentaries, comedy, Spanish language, LGBT, and even a woodworking channel.
Every channel has a 14-day free trial, and afterwards the channels either offer a subscription fee starting at 99 cents per month, or purchases. For example, you can subscribe to Jim Henson’s Family TV for $2.99 per month or $24.99 per year (which includes Fraggle Rock, but not Sesame Street); or, you can buy individual episodes of Sesame Street ($1.99 for SD, $2.99 for HD) or purchase full seasons ($17.99/$27.99).
YouTube plans to continue rolling out more subscription channels with partners that will be adding more “TV-like” series.
Many people get angry at the idea of paid channels on YouTube, but we’ve defended the idea before, and we’ll continue to do it. As you can see with the pilot program, paid subscriptions are bringing in big name content creators like Jim Henson productions, a channel presented by Deion Sanders, and HDNet. Big names like this are only a good thing for YouTube. They won’t be crowding out the ad-supported channels, just adding a new tier of premium content.
As we’ve said many many times before, it’s just like online news. Only the top 5% of the most popular content on YouTube will be able to switch to paid subscriptions and end up making more money than with ad revenue. Just like only news sources at the very top, like NYT and WSJ, can put up a paywall and make it work. Everyone else has to stick with ad support.

Introducing the YouTube Trends Map!

Are teens in the South watching the same videos as middle-aged folks in New England? Now with the YouTube Trends Map (youtube.com/trendsmap), you can see today’s most popular videos in major markets across the U.S. You can also see what’s popular with women or men, as well as by different age groups.

YouTube Trends Map

The Trends Map is the result of all the great feedback y you’ve given us from the Trends Dashboard, as we keep working to help you find great videos and channels on YouTube. For now, the Trends Map is only available for the U.S., but stay tuned for updates.

Check out the Trends Map FAQ for any questions, and happy trend-tracking!