Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge Problems Starts Showing!

Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge

Plenty of people couldn’t wait to get their hands on Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 edge, and when the handsets finally went official, a lot of customers went head over heels for them. However, users encountered little snags here and there, finding out that the anticipated smartphones came with a couple of issues.

Oversensitive Touch Screen

The screen is just too sensitive, causing users to accidentally open an app or select other elements of the interface. This issue isn’t entirely new for Samsung, as the Galaxy Note 5 also bore a similar problem in which the user’s fingers or thumb rest on the phablet’s edges, making other input unresponsive.

Until Samsung tones this down a bit, the only solution right now is to get a case that can provide a better grip on the handset.

Bluetooth Is Always On

The Galaxy S7 and S7 edge came with Bluetooth Low Energy, but unfortunately, it stays on even when Bluetooth is turned off, eating up precious battery life.

Android Developers suggests that users should never scan on a loop, and to set a time limit on the scan to steer clear of this battery-intensive problem.

Bluetooth Connectivity

Another issue that users have reported is how the smartphone can’t connect to other devices such as a car’s audio system and whatnot.

To resolve this, head on over to Settings > Applications > Application Manager. Select More and then Show System Apps. Look for Bluetooth Share, then tap on Force Stop, and clear the cache and data.

No Adoptable Storage

One of the most anticipated features of Android Marshmallow is Adoptable Storage, an option that basically turns both the internal and external storages into one. As everyone can imagine, Galaxy S7 and S7 edge owners were not happy when Samsung decided to drop it.

Unfortunately, there’s no switch to easily turn this on, but Paul O Brien of MoDaCo presented a neat method to do so, although it’s not exactly easy and it involves some risk.

At any rate, the devices still allow users to install apps on the microSD card.

Overheating

Many users have reported that the smartphones in question get warm to an uncomfortable level. For newly bought devices, that’s pretty much expected, as they will download, update and install a slew of apps on the first boot. If the heat persists after that process, then that’s the problem.

A simple reboot could do the trick. To do this, press and hold the power and volume down buttons for 10 seconds, and the device should restart.

Two other things to take note of is to not use the smartphone while it’s charging and to turn off Fast cable charging over at Settings > Battery.

Constant MicroSD Card Prompt

The microSD pop-up message is expected on each reboot, but when it appears randomly, that spells an issue.

There’s no real home solution for this, but do make sure that the microSD card is sitting right on the tray or that the external storage is not faulty itself. If the problem lies in the device, getting in touch with Samsung or the corresponding carrier or retailer is the only option.

Lag

Considering that both the Galaxy S7 and S7 edge are premium devices, lag and stutter must have been at the bottom of the list of anyone’s expectations. Apparently, they should’ve been somewhere at the top.

One fix here is to set the Windows animation scale, Transition animation scale and Animator duration scale in the Developer options to 0.5x or off, which are 1x by default.

This should make things a little faster. For those who haven’t unlocked it yet, head on over to Settings > System > About device > Software info and repeatedly tap on Build number until a message pops up about being a developer. The Developer options tab should be under System at that point.

Another one is to wipe the cache partition. Turn the device off and turn it on by pressing and holding the home, volume up and power buttons at the same time. Once the Samsung logo is in plain view, let go of the power button, but hold on to the other two until the Android logo makes an appearance. This will bring up the Android recovery menu. There, just select the wipe cache partition by using the volume rocker to navigate and the power button to confirm and do a reboot.

If all else fails, then a factory reset might be in order. Needless to say, this will wipe everything out.

Unresponsive Buttons

The home and multitask buttons are reportedly unresponsive at times. A reboot sometimes fixes this, but the issue is said to be caused by an app, so some uninstallations might be required.

Again, the extreme fix here is to do a factory reset.

Slow Wi-Fi

A user at the Android Central forums reports that the S7 edge is causing some Wi-Fi issues, causing the connection to drop or become slow.

“After messing around a bit, I disable Wi-Fi, and the issue instantly goes away. Another hour into messing with things, and I realize it is my phone that is somehow causing the problem. I turn on Wi-Fi on the phone, and the Internet has all sorts of problems, but the moment I disable Wi-Fi, everything is fine,” the user says.

There’s no solid fix yet, but some of the noteworthy mentions in the thread include turning Bluetooth off and to set the Wi-Fi connection to IPv4 instead of IPv6.

Wet Speakers

With an IP68 waterproof rating, there’s no way that users haven’t tried to submerge the smartphone in water yet. However, it’s causing some problems for the audio front.

According to the user reports, the speakers would blast distorted sound after the device gets wet. It’s not a big issue at all, though, as waiting for the handset to dry will take care of it. Just don’t use a blow dryer, as the heat could damage some of the guts of the smartphone.

Camera Failure

Some users have complained that the camera app doesn’t work sometimes, facing the prompt “Warning: Camera Failed.”

A simple reset could fix this, but a hard reset could do better. To do this, just press and hold down the power and home buttons until the smartphone restarts.

If the problem persists, go to Settings > Applications > Application manager and look for Camera. As usual, Force Stop it and clear the data and cache.

Edge Screen Rejection

David Ruddock of Android Police reports that edge screen doesn’t properly reject an input. It looks like the issue is in the device itself, as the Canada variant of one of his colleagues just got an update that fixes it.

Again, there’s no solution here besides wait for the carriers to roll out a patch.

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iPhone 6s Plus crushes Galaxy S7 edge in side-by-side speed test

iPhone 6s Rose Gold

The Galaxy S7 is Samsung’s best smartphone to date and it’s performed well in stress tests, including water resistance tests and extensive drop tests. Now for the first time, someone has done a side-by-side speed test of the Galaxy S7 and the iPhone 6s and it shows that Apple’s flagship phone is still king when it comes to real-world performance.

Specifically, YouTube user Jerome Ortega ran a performance test across various top devices, including the Moto X Pure Edition, the Nexus 6P, the Galaxy S7 edge, and the iPhone 6s Plus.

All devices are running freshly installed operating systems, have no SIM cards, and all have the same apps installed. The point of the test is to see how fast each phone runs a sequence of apps. We’ve seen this sort of comparison done before between iPhones and other Samsung phones and the iPhone has traditionally come out on top despite having inferior hardware specifications.

In this case, the iPhone 6S Plus has 2GB of RAM and a dual-core A9 chip, while the Galaxy S7 edge has 4GB of RAM and an octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 processor. Recent tests have shown that the new Snapdragon 820 CPU barely outperforms the A9.

galaxy-s7-edge-iphone-6s-plus-performance-test

Those of you expecting the Galaxy S7 edge to come out the faster device will be surprised to see the iPhone beating its new rival quite easily, as you can see in the scores in the image above. The iPhone 6s Plus ran through the test cycle with 17 seconds to spare compared to the Galaxy S7 edge.

The iPhone 6s is snappier than the Galaxy S7 edge, which is impressive. For the sake of the argument, we’ll note that the Nexus 6P almost matches the Galaxy S7 edge in speed, with the Moto X Pure coming in the last spot.

Check out the full video below

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MWC 2016: Samsung’s Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge now Waterproof with better Battery, Cameras and SD Card Support!

Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge pictures

Samsung had something to prove with last year’s Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge. It wanted to show the world that it too could make high-end smartphones with great design and premium materials, just like Apple and HTC have done for years. And it succeeded: the S6 models were by far the nicest smartphones ever to come out of the Korean giant’s factories. 

The cheesy plastic was ditched and replaced with metal and glass. This move did wonders to shake Samsung’s bad rap for making cheap feeling, ugly devices. But they weren’t without flaws: high prices, the removal of expandable storage and waterproofing, and poor battery life disappointed many reviewers and buyers, and the S6 line hasn’t turned around Samsung’s sinking mobile business.

Now the company is launching its next volley, the Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge. The new S7 models don’t rewrite the book — they borrow liberally from the S6’s design and feature set. But they bring numerous refinements and improvements, and they restore features that went missing from the Galaxy S6 line. They are, very likely, the best phones that Samsung has ever made.

Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge pictures

Samsung has tightened up the S6’s overall design for the S7: it’s more comfortable to hold, easier to pick up off of a table, has a flatter fingerprint scanner, and has a less pronounced camera hump. It won’t look unfamiliar to anyone that’s seen or held the S6, and it still looks remarkably similar to the iPhone 6 and 6S depending on which angle you look at it from. The standard S7 retains the 5.1-inch, quad HD Super AMOLED display from its predecessor.

The S7 Edge has received a more thorough update: it’s been given a larger, 5.5-inch display (still quad HD Super AMOLED and curved on both sides), and been refined even further. The back of the device has a slight curve to it now, making it much more comfortable to hold than last year’s phone. It’s also remarkably small, especially when its put side-by-side with other phones with 5.5-inch screens, such as the iPhone 6S Plus. The S7 Edge is a phone that most people could use with one hand, and it slips into a pocket with ease, despite having a spacious display. In the brief time I spent with it, I was taken away by how nice it was to hold in my hand. It’s a stunning piece of technology.

Both phones have support for microSD cards to augment their 32GB of internal storage (Samsung says a 64GB model will be available in some regions, but the US will just have the 32GB), as well as IP68 water and dust resistance, which allows for submersion in up to 1.5 meters of water for 30 minutes at a time. The S7’s waterproofing includes sealed ports, so there are no fussy port covers over the USB ports or headphone jacks. The S7 does not use USB Type-C, but sticks with the traditional Micro USB port. Samsung says this is because Micro USB retains compatibility with the Gear VR headset released last year, and that USB C isn’t quite ready for the mainstream just yet.

Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge pictures

Additionally, the S7 line is powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 820 processor in North America, a departure from Samsung’s own Exynos chips that were in the S6. (Samsung is still using Exynos processors in the S7 for other regions of the world.) The RAM has been stepped up to 4GB this time around.

While Samsung brought back the expandable storage and water resistance of its earlier Galaxy models, like the S6, the S7 line does not have removable batteries. Instead, to address the battery life deficiencies of last year, Samsung increased the size of the phones’ batteries, up to 3,000mAh in the S7 (up from 2,550mAh in the S6) and 3,600mAh for the S7 Edge (vs 2,600 in the S6 Edge). Those batteries are significantly larger, especially in the S7 Edge, so hopefully the battery woes of the S6 are left in the past. Both phones also retain Samsung’s adaptive fast charging and fast wireless charging features.

Perhaps the most significant change this year comes in the S7’s new 12-megapixel camera. It’s lower resolution than last year’s 16-megapixel shooter, but Samsung says its larger pixels let in 56 percent more light than before for better low light images. The camera’s lens is a brighter f/1.7 aperture, allowing in 25 percent more light. Combined, the new sensor and lens let in 95 percent more light than last year’s already impressive camera, which is promising for low light photography. The sensor’s shape has also changed from a wide-format 16:9 to a more traditional 4:3 ratio.

Samsung says the new camera can focus up to three times faster thanks to its dual-pixel system that allows every single one of the 12 million pixels to act as focus pixels, similar to the system Canon uses in some of its DSLR cameras. The camera is also very quick to launch — in brief demos it handily beat out a Nexus 6P and iPhone 6S Plus in getting ready to take a shot.

For software, the S7 models are running Android 6.0 Marshmallow with Samsung’s TouchWiz interface. There are couple new enhancements for the S7’s edge swipe features, but the big new software trick is the Always-On Display, which permanently shows a clock with notifications, a calendar, or an image on the S7’s screen. It is not a motion activated display, like Motorola’s Active Display or Google’s ambient display, but remains on all the time. Samsung says the features only consumes half a percent of battery per hour in its tests, and if the proximity sensor is covered, as when the phone is in a bag or pocket, the screen will shut off.

The S7 and S7 Edge will be available on all four major carriers in the US starting on March 11th, with preorders beginning on February 23rd. The S7 will come in black or gold, while the S7 Edge will come in black, gold, or silver options. Samsung is sweetening the deal for early adopters with a free Gear VR offer with purchase of either S7 running February 23rd through March 18th. Samsung says that pricing for the new models should be in line with last year’s phones at launch, so the S7 and S7 Edge won’t be coming cheap.

Though Samsung produced a great product with the S6 last year, it didn’t stop the company from losing market share and profits in its mobile division. Samsung is facing ever stiffer competition, not only from its traditional rivals like Apple and LG, but also from lower-cost Chinese manufacturers that have eaten away at the low-end of Samsung’s business. The S7 and S7 Edge are not reinventions of the wheel, but iterations and refinements, and address some pain points of the older models. Whether that’s enough to turn Samsung’s smartphone business around remains to be seen, but it will be an interesting show to watch.

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Samsung Galaxy S7 revealed in new Leaked images!

samsung galaxy S7 edge leak

What could be leaked images of the Samsung Galaxy S7 have been released, just under a fortnight ahead of the upcoming flagship smartphone’s official launch.

One image, released by Vietnamese tech website ReviewDao, appears to show the back of the device, but unfortunately doesn’t give too much away.One of the leaked images was published by Vietnamese tech site ReviewDao

We can’t confirm much about the phone’s rumoured specs from the image, but SamMobile pointed out the camera does appear to be a little more flush with the back plate than it was in the S6, potentially proving one of the many S7 rumours right.

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It also looks like the back is plastic, and not glass, as has been rumoured – however, according to SamMobile this phone may only be a prototype, so we shouldn’t take it as an accurate impression of how the final phone will look.

You can catch a glimpse of the metal frame on the sides of the device, however, which is apparently magnesium and not aluminium, according to rumours.

Another leaked image, which was released around the same time on Chinese social network Weibo, purports to show the front of the S7 Edge, the larger, curved-screen version of the phone, which will likely be released alongside the standard model on 21 February.

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The image shows the phone displaying the results of an AnTuTu benchmark test, which labels the phone as an SM-G9350, which earlier leaks have claimed is the S7 Edge’s model number.

The benchmarking result, which reflects the phone’s technical performance, is 134704, which is what could be expected for a phone with the S7’s rumoured specs.

Samsung-Galaxy-S7-leak

The images don’t reveal too much by themselves, but they could have confirmed a few stories about the long-awaited phone.

The Galaxy S7 is due to be unveiled at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona on Sunday 21 February, in an event which starts at 6PM GMT